Regular Features:
Edition 6: Winter 09



From the Editor's Desk

In our last edition, we explored the concept of resilience among refugee children and adolescents. In that issue we looked at strategies that are protective but which focused largely at the individual or non-collective level.

This time, I thought it would be helpful to consider resilience from the point of view of the two most influential social systems for young people: home and school. How can we help to strengthen the healing potential of the family and of the school communities? In keeping with this theme, our case study this month is about a group intervention, showing how this way of working can offer an important emotional resource in the recovery process.

Supporting communities to buffer the pain and loss caused by refugee trauma is not easy. But I hope you will agree that our regular contributors and special guest writers have provided much food for thought in the following pieces.

Max Schneider signature hintsforhealing@startts.org.au
Next month
Deb's digest
Deb Gould We might not consciously parent or teach for resilience, but it is a wonderful outcome of these processes that a child grows into an identity and is able to deal with adversity. What happens, however, if one is born into extreme adversity and the conditions for developing resilience are threatened? How can we as counsellors and educators be part of a second chance for refugee children?  Learn more >>
> Deb Gould is a STARTTS Clinical Psychologist and clinical supervisor.
Promoting Resilience and Healing in te School - Elizabeth Pickering
Elizabeth Pickering For a number of years I have been involved in presenting training about the refugee experience to people who work in schools. Quite frequently during training people respond by saying things like, 'These experiences are so terrible, what could we possibly do?' and 'What we really need is to send our refugee students to specialists.' Learn more >>
> Elisabeth Pickering is a school counsellor at Cabramatta Intensive
English Centre.
Case Study - Marc Chaussivert
Marc Chaussivert This case study is about a group intervention for a small group of young women. It is interesting as an illustration of the benefits of group interventions alongside individual work in providing a level of support that is not available through only conducting individual interventions. Learn more >>
> Marc Chaussivert works as a clinical psychologist and team leader at STARTTS.
Families in Disequlibrium - Julie Savage
Julie Savage has worked with refugee clients for over ten years, predominantly using a family systems approach in her work. In this interview, she shares some of the common struggles faced by refugee families as well as helpful ideas to support their needs. Learn more >>
Families in Cultural Transition - Elizabeth Schaffer
Learning to feel safe in Australia and to re-build their lives in their adopted country is a hard journey for refugee children and their families, who must deal with the many stresses that can result from adjusting to life in a new culture. Learn more >>
Promoting Positive Behaviour and Learning - Greg Maguire
Last month, the Department of Education and Training (DET) launched an exciting new resource designed to help schools working with refugee students at both primary and secondary levels. Learn more >>

Capoeria Angola Groups. STARTTS is now facilitating 7 Capoeria groups for young people during Semester 2, 2009. As well as an ongoing group running from STARTTS Carramar office (on Tuesday evenings, from 5.00 to 6.30pm), groups are being organised to run from each of the following Intensive English Centres (IECs): Miller, Evans, Chester Hill, Fairfield, Merrylands and Cabramatta. For more information and to secure a place, contact Chiara Ridolfi via email on chiara.ridolfi@sswahs.nsw.gov.au or telephone 0401 537 515.

More on Capoeira... Cabramatta IEC, STARTTS and Project Bantu are launching the Cabramatta Capoeria Angola Program on Friday 7th of August, at Cabramatta High School Theatre, from 12-1 pm. Come along to support the program and find out more about this traditional African art form that combined dance, martial arts, acrobatics, music and dancing. Contact Chiara chiara.ridolfi@sswahs.nsw.gov.au for more information.

FastForWord PROGRAM. STARTTS together with the Bert Oldfield (Blacktown) and the Marsden Road (Liverpool) Primary Schools is implementing a new intervention to support some of the students who would benefit from assistance with learning.

This exciting and promising program, called FastForWord, will enable students who are having difficulty with language to have access to a scientifically-based intervention.

The FastForWord program develops and strengthens memory, attention, processing rate, and sequencing—the cognitive skills essential for learning and reading success. The strengthening of these skills results in a wide range of improved critical language and reading skills such as phonological awareness, phonemic awareness, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, decoding, working memory, syntax, and grammar.

Read more about this program in our next issue...

 

Max Schneider
> Max is a Child & Adolescent Counsellor at STARTTS and the service's School Liaison Officer.

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Capoeira Angola Groups STARTTS is now facilitating 7 Capoeria groups for young people during Semester 2, 2009.
Learn more >>

More on Capoeira...
Cabramatta IEC, STARTTS and Project Bantu are launching the Cabramatta Capoeria Angola Program

Learn more >>

Soccer Manual
A soccer manual for those who want to run soccer tournaments with refugee young people is being finalised and will soon be available. For more information email Mohamed Baaruud

Youth Camp
A mixed gender youth camp will be held at Rivendell during the October school holidays. For more information email Lina Ishu

FastForWord Program
STARTTS together with the Bert Oldfield (Blacktown) and the Marsden Road (Liverpool) Primary Schools is implementing a new intervention to support some of the students who would benefit from assistance with learning.

Learn more >>

Hint of the month
Articulate expectations of growth:
'things will get better';
'we all take time to learn';
'each day is a new day.'
- Source: Promoting Positive Behaviour and Learning – Assisting Refugee Students at School. NSW Department of Education and Training.

Disclaimer The information contained in Hints for Healing is provided as an information source only.  The views expressed by contributors do not necessarily reflect the position or views of STARTTS.  The material is provided on the basis that readers are responsible for making their own assessments of the issues discussed, and always work under clinical supervision.

© 2009 STARTTS  Contact: hintsforhealing@startts.org.au
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